Ben Casnocha compiles a list of grievances and observations on “restaurants, tips, and bread baskets”. For example:

If I were a restaurant manager I would spend 30 minutes with each of my waiters explaining the research around how to maximize tips from patrons. For example, leaving a mint with the bill or drawing a smiley face on the bill have been shown to increase tip. Research also suggests that the tip amount is only marginally connected with the actual quality of wait service. Bottom line is that many waiters miss out on easy psychological hacks that would increase their tips.

And this; one of the four rules-of-thumb from Tyler Cowen’s recently updated Ethnic Dining Guide (via Kottke):

Avoid dishes that are “ingredients-intensive.” Raw ingredients in America [and likely the UK, too] – vegetables, butter, bread, meats, etc. – are below world standards. Even most underdeveloped countries have better raw ingredients than we do, at least if you have a U.S. income to spend there, and often even if one doesn’t. Ordering the plain steak in Latin America may be a great idea, but it is usually a mistake in Northern Virginia. Opt for dishes with sauces and complex mixes of ingredients. Go for dishes that are “composition-intensive.”